Lafuma Eco Backpack

This backpack looks really cool. I wonder about the recycled polyester though and how it will hold up in harsh weather conditions. Seems they are on the right track though. This french clothing company has a solid history.

clipped from www.treehugger.com

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When we saw that Lafuma had won another award for their Eco 40 Rucksack we knew it was time to dig around the notes we’ve had gathering dust since this product was released. During 2007 it has scored two gongs. First, the French Etoile de l’Observeur du Design and just last month the Ispo Performance Award for Eco-responsibility.

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Recycled sleeping bags

Another cool product– lafuma and these. Source: http://www.treehugger.com/files/2007/08/seen_before_slu.php

clipped from www.treehugger.com

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What’s with the little flurry of outdoor gear posts, you might wondering. Well, the summer trade shows have now passed, and the detail of upcoming goodies is slowing seeping out into the world wide ether. The goss is that Green is big. And only going to get bigger. Take for example, the rush of recycled content sleeping bags that Alicia MacLeay of Trailspace spied at the Outdoor Retailer show. Big Agnes, of Colorado, will soon have some sleeping bags that are 97% by weight. The missing percentage is the zipper. So the insulation (Climashield HL Green), ripstop shell fabric, plus drawcords and stuffsack are said to all be 100% recycled content. Even the cordlock is 50% corn starch based PLA. Big Agnes are calling the line of bags their Re-Routt collection. Their blurb suggests the lightweight shell material is a recycled nylon. But that appears to be a typo, as most recycled fabrics currently tend to be polyester. (But more on that another day.)

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Image of the Salvaged Cotton Saris

Source: http://www.treehugger.com/files/2007/08/sari_roll.php
clipped from www.treehugger.com

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Treat your baubles with a little TLC, a sure way to extend their longevity, by wrapping them in a soft jewelery roll hand-stitched from salvaged cotton saris and secured with a loop-and-button closure.

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Salvaged cotton saris

This product looks interesting– apparently you can get them cheaper in Cambodia however. Nice example of recycled fabrics.
clipped from www.treehugger.com
Treat your baubles with a little TLC, a sure way to extend their longevity, by wrapping them in a soft jewelery roll hand-stitched from salvaged cotton saris and secured with a loop-and-button closure.
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Beeline beauty products – all natural?

This new line of beauty products looks interesting. The trouble with bees is that the can go everywhere– they fly in and out of different environments and can pollinate on plants/flowers that are not organic. So even if the ingredients in the product are pure and natural, the bees may be contimated thus contaminating the honey. Some honeys are purely organic. But not this honey. Worth giving it a try anyway.

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2007/08/beeline_beauty.php

More insights from the Pakistan cotton industry

clipped from 64.233.169.104
it is a fact that conventional production methods (of cotton as

well as textiles) are associated with significant and avoidable environmental or health-

related costs
hese concerns have led to a number of actions to induce a switch to such

sustainable alternatives as organic cotton, integrated pest management, chemical-free

textile processing,



2



and effluent quality standards.
The cotton commodity chain can be divided into three broad stages: production,

processing, and marketing.
The textiles and apparel industry is a classic example of what Gary Gereffi (1994)

terms a buyer-driven global commodity chain, in other words one that is driven by large

retailers rather than producers or processors. According to Gereffi, commodity chains

have three main dimensions: 1) and input-output structure, 2) territoriality, ie spatial

dispersion or concentration of enterprises of different sizes and types, and 3) a

governance structure,
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Pakistan’s perspective on the greening of cotton

This paper provides interesting insights into how the cotton industry is run, key production and profit drivers as well as how the industry can be ‘greened.’
clipped from 64.233.169.104
Recent years have seen growing concern in industrialized countries about the
environmental impact of cotton production and processing. The bona fides of such
biological diversity. The signing of the GATT agreement added other concerns, in
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